Repercussions from a 1.1 Tbsp DDoS

In case you missed it, the largest recorded Direct Denial of Service (DDoS) occurred. While under DDoS, a victim’s server (or servers) is under high load and cannot complete all requests that are requested by it. Basically, a DDoS victim is someone the attacker wants silenced on the internet. In order to send a DDoS of that magnitude, the attacker has to have control over many computers – a botnet. It is believed that this attack originated from over 150,000 computers in the IoT category (smart TVs, refrigerators, thermostats, etc.). Due to their poor default security, the IoT devices are easy targets for hackers who intend on adding them to their botnets. A recent article on Ars Technica points out the current issues with IoT and Linux kernel security, but with most articles of this nature, provides no clear cut solution to the problem we are experiencing. Below are my thoughts to this current situation and how it may be resolved.

We need a governing body to issue a seal of approval for IoT and anything that is compiled with the Linux kernel. Then we, as consumers, must use, buy, and encourage others to buy from the companies that have this seal. The governing body should ensure each company seeking the seal comply with the following criteria:

  1. Every new device created and sent to market has a minimum of 5 years worth of bi-monthly security patches and updates since the day of release to the public.
  2. In the event the company goes bankrupt, dissolves, or cannot support any older product they have released in the past 5 years, the company must provide schematics, instructions, or software that open source enthusiasts can recreate, patch, or upgrade the legacy product.
  3. No known vulnerability must be willingly left unpatched.
  4. When a CVE is identified on a company’s product, a test case must be created and run on that code base for every future release.
  5. A notification service must be in place when new updates are released and must be available in RSS or email form.
  6. Automatic updates should occur over HTTPS
  7. Backdoors, admin terminals, etc. should require a physical connector be applied on the device in order to grant access.

    For a potential company to get this approval, it may seem like an arduous task to get all the controls in place; however, by applying DevOps methodologies, these tasks can be a simple feat. This would require the governing body to not only enforce the list, but also have the training available to comply to this list. For this reason, I suggest the Linux Foundation to become this governing body and issue out seals of approval.

    Add to the conversation:

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.